Online Learning and Innovation Webinar Series Starts January 23

UNCG University Libraries presents a webinar series on "Online Learning and Innovation."  This webinar series is for UNCG faculty, instructors, librarians, graduate students, TAs, and staff interested in learning more about instructional technology and online learning at UNCG. Sign-up form.

Some of the topics included are online learning pedagogies, UNCG instructional technology tools (Canvas, Google, Box, etc) and more.  These webinars are all 30 minutes and are hosted in Webex Meetings.  Once participants sign up, they will get an email with link to the session the day before the webinar.

Thursday, January 23 at 1 p.m.
“Canvas Studio/Arc: Embedding Quizzes in Lecture Capture Videos” by Aprille Black, a Bryan School Instructional Technology Consultant (ITC)

Monday, January 27 at 2 p.m.
“Open Pedagogy and Open Education at UNCG” by Samantha Harlow, Online Learning Librarian. *Part of UNCG’s OER week, leading up to application due date for OER Mini Grants: http://go.uncg.edu/oerminigrants
Open Educational Resources (OER) are vital to creating accessible and affordable courses for UNCG students. Open pedagogy is "high-impact practice that empowers students by providing them an opportunity to engage in information creation through the use of renewable assignments."  This webinar will cover open pedagogy, open tools to help with open pedagogy, and OER resources from UNCG University Libraries.

Thursday, March 12 at 2 p.m.
“Creating Self-scoring Assessment Using Qualtrics” by Rob Owens, a Bryan School Instructional Technology Consultant (ITC)

Tuesday, March 16 at 11 a.m.
“JSTOR Tools for Text Analysis Projects” by Maggie Murphy, Humanities Librarian
Text analysis is a series of techniques for processing text and revealing complex patterns across a collection of documents, in order to generate new insights for researchers. This webinar will introduce a set of tools from JSTOR that students can use to explore the concept of text analysis and how it can be used in humanities research.

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